First Person — 4 Minutes

Bullying and Imagination

First Person — 4 Minutes

Bullying and Imagination

Ainsley Knight speaks with Joshua Miller.

Ainsley shares some of her experiences while growing up with autism (including being bullied by “The Anti-Ainsley Club”), the positives autism has provided her, and her career goals.

Joshua Miller: My name is Joshua Miller. I’m with the Autism News Network and I’m sitting down with-

Ainsley Knight: Ainsley Knight.

Joshua Miller: Ainsley, what does autism feel like?

Ainsley Knight: Having autism feels very unique and very different because each person with autism is unique and very special.

Joshua Miller: How has it affected your daily life?

Ainsley Knight: My daily life has been affected in so many ways because I do things differently than most people do. For instance, in high school, I had preferential seating. I had printed out notes, I had a calculator I could use on my algebra tests and, yes.

Joshua Miller: Would you say that school was stressful for you when you were in school?

Ainsley Knight: Yes, it was. Very, very much. And I was bullied in the fifth grade. It was not a good experience at all because there was a club made called the anti-Ainsley club and that made me just really sad and I just wanted to leave school right then and there. So, yeah.

Joshua Miller: I’m sorry to hear that.

Ainsley Knight: That’s okay.

Joshua Miller: What is a positive to have an autism?

Ainsley Knight: A positive to having autism is you get to have a vivid imagination, and you get to do things differently, and you get to meet other people with autism, and you get to see what their interests are and so forth. Yes.

Joshua Miller: What are some of the stuff that you do differently versus somebody that doesn’t have autism? Since you brought it up.

Ainsley Knight: So one of the things I do differently are I always listen to music whenever I’m really stressed out. And whenever I’m upset I usually hang out with my pet dog, Cindy. And I usually isolate myself because I need some me time. Yeah.

Joshua Miller: How open are you about your autism diagnosis?

Ainsley Knight: I’m open, even though it’s sometimes embarrassing to talk about it, because autism is, it’s unique. Yes.

Joshua Miller: How has your autism affected the people around you or the people close to you?

Ainsley Knight: My family supports me and they do everything they can to help me, and my extended relatives and family, they support me also. And my friends support me and my mentor supports me. So I get a lot of support, love and care.

Joshua Miller: That’s good. Do you have any dreams or goals or aspirations about the future?

Ainsley Knight: Oh yes. I do. I hope to become a phlebotomist one day, which is a person that draws blood. I know that’s strange to some people, but that’s one of my main goals.

Joshua Miller: That’s good. Because we always need people to give us shots and collect blood.

Ainsley Knight: Yes.

Joshua Miller: And what advice would you give to someone who has recently been diagnosed with autism?

Ainsley Knight: Some advice I would give is don’t let people underestimate you and don’t let them see you as a disease spreading person. Because that’d be really upsetting to some people. And just be yourself.

Joshua Miller: my name is Joshua Miller. And I was been sitting here with Ainsley Knight and talking about what it’s like for her to have autism. Thank you very much.

Joshua Miller: My name is Joshua Miller. I’m with the Autism News Network and I’m sitting down with-

Ainsley Knight: Ainsley Knight.

Joshua Miller: Ainsley, what does autism feel like?

Ainsley Knight: Having autism feels very unique and very different because each person with autism is unique and very special.

Joshua Miller: How has it affected your daily life?

Ainsley Knight: My daily life has been affected in so many ways because I do things differently than most people do. For instance, in high school, I had preferential seating. I had printed out notes, I had a calculator I could use on my algebra tests and, yes.

Joshua Miller: Would you say that school was stressful for you when you were in school?

Ainsley Knight: Yes, it was. Very, very much. And I was bullied in the fifth grade. It was not a good experience at all because there was a club made called the anti-Ainsley club and that made me just really sad and I just wanted to leave school right then and there. So, yeah.

Joshua Miller: I’m sorry to hear that.

Ainsley Knight: That’s okay.

Joshua Miller: What is a positive to have an autism?

Ainsley Knight: A positive to having autism is you get to have a vivid imagination, and you get to do things differently, and you get to meet other people with autism, and you get to see what their interests are and so forth. Yes.

Joshua Miller: What are some of the stuff that you do differently versus somebody that doesn’t have autism? Since you brought it up.

Ainsley Knight: So one of the things I do differently are I always listen to music whenever I’m really stressed out. And whenever I’m upset I usually hang out with my pet dog, Cindy. And I usually isolate myself because I need some me time. Yeah.

Joshua Miller: How open are you about your autism diagnosis?

Ainsley Knight: I’m open, even though it’s sometimes embarrassing to talk about it, because autism is, it’s unique. Yes.

Joshua Miller: How has your autism affected the people around you or the people close to you?

Ainsley Knight: My family supports me and they do everything they can to help me, and my extended relatives and family, they support me also. And my friends support me and my mentor supports me. So I get a lot of support, love and care.

Joshua Miller: That’s good. Do you have any dreams or goals or aspirations about the future?

Ainsley Knight: Oh yes. I do. I hope to become a phlebotomist one day, which is a person that draws blood. I know that’s strange to some people, but that’s one of my main goals.

Joshua Miller: That’s good. Because we always need people to give us shots and collect blood.

Ainsley Knight: Yes.

Joshua Miller: And what advice would you give to someone who has recently been diagnosed with autism?

Ainsley Knight: Some advice I would give is don’t let people underestimate you and don’t let them see you as a disease spreading person. Because that’d be really upsetting to some people. And just be yourself.

Joshua Miller: my name is Joshua Miller. And I was been sitting here with Ainsley Knight and talking about what it’s like for her to have autism. Thank you very much.

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